Title: First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint
Date/Period: 1760s (TOWER marked)


First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, right facing

Measurement: Overall length: 63"; barrel length: 47.25"

Material: Full walnut stock, steel, and brass

Additional Information: A rare English musket…
1756 Pattern Long Land Tower Flintlock Musket with TOWER marked lock plate. Commonly referred to as the 'First Model
Brown Bess', the Pattern 1756 Long Land Pattern Tower Musket was the standard British infantry musket during the French and
Indian War period and remained in service with both the British Regular and Loyalist regiments and the American Army during
the American Revolution. This musket is complete retaining all correct pattern 1756 components. The barrel has a smooth brown
patina, the lockplate, cock, and hammer display a uniform dark gunmetal patina. All brass furniture displays an old dark honey
patina. There are four brass ramrod pipes and an iron button-head ramrod. The bayonet lug on the top of the barrel serves as
the front sight. The slightly curved lock plate has an integral iron flash pan, single sear screw-head behind the cock, and trefoil
frizzen spring tip. The lock plate is vertically engraved “TOWER”. The "Crown/GR" cypher of King George III located under
powder pan is very faint, possibly deliberately scrubbed by a Patriot during the Revolution. The Broad Arrow property mark is
stamped in the backside of the sideplate as is “XXII” assembly mark and “H”.

The cock has the delicately formed style tang, oval top jaw and slotted, solid jaw screw found on all Long Land muskets. The
edges of the lock plate, cock, top jaw, and hammer are double line border engraved. The English walnut stock has a slight flare
[swell] above the brass rear entry pipe as it should. Correct 1740-1756 Pattern Long Land brass nose cap, trumpet-mouth upper
ramrod guide; brass trigger guard with simplified finial; distinctive, convex faced, brass side plate and brass buttplate with
elongated tang that distinguish the Long Land muskets from the Pattern 1769 Short Land, Marine and Militia muskets. A brass
wrist plate is inlaid within the stock behind the breech tang. The top of the .82-caliber, 47.25-inch barrel is stamped with the
"Crown/GR/Broad Arrow" King's proof mark and "Crown/Crossed Scepter" view mark. There appears to be two smaller marks on
the left side of barrel that are indecipherable. What appears to be a faint ordinance inspectors mark is visible on the bottom of
stock behind trigger guard finial. The initials “IFC” are carved in the left side of stock below the comb suggesting that this musket
saw American use. British soldiers would have been punished for initialing the King's muskets. Brown Bess muskets used by
American soldiers in the French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars were frequently carved with prominent initials. Muskets
associated with the British army were not defaced by the initials of individual soldiers.

The Long Land Brown Bess musket, the first regulation firearm used in North America was the highest quality military longarm
issued by any army…the iconic weapon of the Revolutionary War. A Brown Bess musket likely fired "the shot heard round the
world"
on the Lexington Common April 18, 1775 - no weapon is more closely associated with the history of Colonial America than
the Long Land Brown Bess musket. The Long Land Pattern Brown Bess muskets saw hard service with the British and American
armies in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution…no firearm is more closely associated with the critical
events of the founding of the United States than the Long Land Brown Bess musket. These workhorses were used nearly to
extinction resultant in extreme scarcity in any condition; rarely do they present themselves on today’s market. This is a very good
example of the iconic Long Land Brown Bess and is destined to be a cornerstone in any collection of American Firearms.

Condition: Considering age and use, this musket remains in a high degree of originality. The action is smooth and tight, all metal
parts are smooth and display good color and patina. The stock is smooth with soft contours and of rich color and patina;
approximately 80% original color. The beaver tail centering breech tang is worn. Three very early small nails secure a V-shape
fissure to the swell at left side of stock. It appears that a 5 by 1.75-inch wedge of buttstock heel is expertly and subtly restored.
There is a very old, stable fissure to underside of stock on right side above triggerguard bow.
This gun is a rare and important battle veteran and displays handsomely.
Please call David for an enthusiastic conversation.

$19,000.00

861-3



First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, left facing

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, lock plate

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, side plate

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, marks view

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, tang

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, stock

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, trigger guard

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, butt plate 1

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, butt plate 2

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, detail view

First Model Brown Bess, Pattern 1756 Long Land Musket, Original Flint, side plate back




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