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Gold Flashed Sterling Silver Teapot, Presentation to Artemas Ward
Artemas Ward, Son of General Artemas Ward
Rich & Willard operated jewelry/silversmith business in Boston. [1846-1847]
Benjamin Franklin Willard (Boston, son of Simon Willard)
Obadiah Rich (Boston)
Date/Period: 1846 - SOLD


Gold Flashed Sterling Silver Teapot, Presentation to Artemas Ward Artemas Ward, Son of General Artemas Ward Rich & Willard operated jewelry/silversmith business in Boston. [1846-1847] Benjamin Franklin Willard (Boston, son of Simon Willard) Obadiah Rich (Boston), left facing

Measurement: Height: 6"; handle to spout: 10"; width: 5.25"

Material: Gold plated silver, weight: 42 troy ounces

Condition: Fine

Additional Information: A rare and beautiful paneled teapot featuring repousse,
chased, and engraved ornamentation; the hinged lid features a magnificent spread wing
swan. The base is marked "Rich & Willard, Boston Fine" (probably 800 silver). Bottom
engraved "Artemas Ward". Additional information about the maker and owner is
available.

Artemas Ward
Born in 1762 in Shrewsbury, this Artemas Ward also became influential in politics and public service. He married Catherine
Maria Dexter in 1788 and together they had 7 children. He graduated from Harvard with an A.B. in 1783 and a LL. D in 1842
and served on the Board of Overseers. He was an attorney, and practiced law in Weston, MA for seventeen years, often with
brother-in-law Samuel Dexter (Secretary of War to John Adams). Later he moved to Charlestown, and then Boston. Artemas
Ward served in several public roles, including as United States Representative (1813-1815), delegate to the Massachusetts
State Constitutional Convention in 1820, and Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas from 1821 to 1839. He
was an outspoken opponent of United States entry into the War of 1812. He was known for his financial acumen and died in
Boston in 1847.

Benjamin Franklin Willard (1803-1847) was the fifth son of Simon Willard (1753 - 1848) and Simon's second wife, Mary Bird
Willard. He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts on 2 November 1803. He was a talented mechanic, clockmaker, inventor, and
artist.

Like his brother, Simon Willard Jr. (1795 - 1874), Benjamin Franklin Willard received limited schooling and went to work in his
father's clock making shop at a young age. Although he learned the clock making trade, he did not go into the clock making
business for himself; at times he worked for his father and other parties. For instance, in 1840, Willard installed a tower clock in
the First Congregational Church of Falmouth, Massachusetts. It is not known whether this clock survives.

The only clock known to survive is the unique and remarkable astronomical regulator he designed and built in 1844 in his
brother's Boston clock shop at No. 9 Congress Street, Boston. This clock won a Gold Medal from the Massachusetts Charitable
Mechanics Association. It is now in the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

Willard's scientific and technical interests outside of clock making included an invention of a revolving signal light for lighthouses.
In 1828, the United States government contracted with Willard to supply the Light-House Service with his new form of signal light
for the lighthouse at the entrance of Boston harbor. Willard built and tested the clock-driven light at his brother's shop on
Congress Street. The signal light was installed in the Boston Light sometime around 1830 or 1834, and Willard was
compensated $230 for the new equipment and repair of the older machinery. In 1839, Willard thought it best to patent his
invention. A copy of the patent is reproduced in Simon Willard and His Clocks by John Ware Willard.

Willard was also talented artist and calligrapher. Willard worked as secretary of the Boylston Insurance Company and the India
Insurance Company between 1834 and 1838. In 1846-1847, he ran a jewelry and silversmith business in Boston under the name
of Rich & Willard.

Willard died on 11 March 1847 at the age of 43.

SOLD

570-662





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