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History, American Revolutionary
War, Manuscript
Mss. Receipt, 3 Casks Powder for
Salute to honor Gen'l LaFayette
Sept 1, 1824, Lexington Artillery - SOLD


History, American Revolutionary War, Manuscript 
Mss. Receipt, 3 Casks Powder for Salute to honor Gen'l LaFayette
Sept 1, 1824, Lexington Artillery, side 2

Fascinating primary document detailing the Lexington Artillery preparing to honor
Gen'l LaFayette on his 1824 Tour of America. The entire country celebrated the return
of Gen'l LaFayette, a friend and supporter of Gen' George Washington and the
American Cause for Independence, and considered a hero of the American
Revolutionary War

On a 5 x 7" sheet of period paper, mss in ink. Folds, wear, overall excellent.

Transcript as follows:

"Au 29
Deliver to the Lexington Artillery Company
Three Quarter Casks Powder for the
Salute in honor of Gen'l LaFayette

Sept 1, 1824 (signed) hc simmons?? name?

Reverse:

Order 3 Casks Powder
Lexington sept 1 1824

Addressed to: Mr Henry Sharpe

Received in full
Boston Sept 1 1824
Ebnezr Smith"

End Transcript

SOLD

270-165




AMERICAN REVOLUTION: Manuscript: Receipt Book listing supplies of Horses, Wagons, and Tack, supplied to the Continental Army regiments located at Morristown, New Jersey during the period of Aug 8, 1780 to Oct 15, 1780,

Kept at Morristown by James Abeel, Deputy Quarter Master (DQM) under Continental Army Quartermaster General (QMGenl) Nathaniel Greene and on behalf of Col James Thompson,
Continental Army Wagon Master General (WM-Genl.), supplied for use by Washington's Generals and their Brigades assigned to Morristown (and area). Primary Document. - SOLD


AMERICAN REVOLUTION: Manuscript: Receipt Book
listing  supplies of Horses, Wagons, and Tack, supplied
to the Continental Army regiments located at Morristown,
New Jersey during the  period of Aug 8, 1780 to Oct 15, 1780, page view 1

CONTEXT: During the American Revolution years of 1779-1780, General Washington's
main army was encamped at and around Morristown, New Jersey. The Morristown
winter of 1779-80 is reputed as possibly the worst of the 18th century, and the
ill-equipped soldiers suffered significantly throughout the winter. The cost to
George Washington's Army was profound with major losses through illness, death,
expiration of service terms, and desertion. Once past the winter, Washington
faced the urgent need to rebuild his army by replacing the depleted troops and
their necessary supplies. An article on the second Morristown Encampment 1779-80,
found featured on www.worldhistory.biz , can be studied at the very end of this
write-up. It is suggested reading for anyone unfamiliar with the Morristown encampment.

This RECEIPT BOOK, a.k.a. Account Book, consists of 44 detailed transactions (some
with extended entries) concerning the dispatching of Wagons, horses and related tack
to selected brigades at Morristown, NJ between Aug 8 and Oct 15, 1780 by James Abeel,
DQM. on behalf of Col James Thompson, WM-Genl. for the military use by the Generals
and their Brigades at Morristown. Although the content in the 44 transactions is
similar by items issued, the size and volume of the transactions vary by number of
horses, wagons, and related tack, and varies by the intended beneficiary or Brigade General.

This RECEIPT BOOK, measuring 6" x 7.5”, is comprised of approx. 102 sheets
(204 pages) with 44 entries or transactions *(some extended) in manuscript; 160 pages
are blank, and approx. 44 have manuscript content, mostly covering a single side of
one page, with the reverse being blank. The laid paper and covered boards are original,
although the front cover is detached (except for the recent scotch tape repair). In addition,
the first 8 sheets (16 pages) are disbound from the body, with 6 of them remaining one unit.
44 of the blank pages are the reverse of the receipt/receipt copies, and the 116 remaining
blank pages are the final 58 sheets of the book. The inside of the cover shows a yet to be
identified name, possibly one of the book's keepers. The book is all original (cept minor
cover tape) and displays as such. All handwriting is period, and mostly legible, although
many of the recipient signatures are difficult to read and in need of research
to determine correct spellings.

Most/all of the content concerns receipts for horses, wagons and related tack stating
"rec'd from James Abeel Dep Q.M," with almost all mentioning "per the order of Col
James Thompson WM genl (Wagon Master General) . The horses and wagons are dispatched
based on how they'll be used. For example, if the wagon wants a team of 4 horses, the
receipt reflects the right ratio of horses to wagons and again the correct tack to go
with the whole lot. Very interesting, but somewhat repetitive. Several receipts
mention "for the use of Genl Poor’s brigade per/order Col James Thompson, WMGenl”,
or substitute Patterson, Leonard, Glover, and others for the General's names.

To understand the Receipt Book, the players should be viewed as follows: James
Abeel (the DQM or Supply Manager), James Thompson (Wagon Master
General or Requestor In Charge of Wagons, Horses, et al, on behalf of the Continental
Army Brigade/Brigade Generals at Morristown) , and General Poor, Green, Leonard,
and other Generals (recipients/beneficiaries of Thompson's authorized issues) and of
course the receipt signer (the person who is taking possession, making delivery or
otherwise signing for the transaction)

CONTENT: Approximately the first 26 entries are transcribed here. Please note that
where there is a marking CONTENT with a brief description, the actual content is much
longer and very detailed. The shortcut is taken simply to save this writer the time
of complete transcriptions. In addition, the spelling is not necessarily the same as the
entry spelling as these transcriptions were done without an attempt to be 100%
accurate, yet they do reflect the flavor and content appropriately.

FIRST 10 ENTRIES: (pretty accurate in detail) Note: the entries may be a bit out of
order as the first few pages are detached from the main body, and loosely reinserted
with attention order. Pages were transcribed as encountered

"Rec'd at Morris Town Aug 15 1780
from James Abeel, DQM Genl one wagon
four collars four prs harness and thngs
four pr braces four back bands four
belly bands two breast chains one
tongue chain four blind bridles two ???
one for rope leading lines for wagon cover
one wagon bolt one tarr pot two complete
pens one doubletree one stretcher and one
lock chain for the use of Genl Nixon's brigade
By order Coll Thompson WM Genl
Nathaniel Torry "


"Rec'd at Morris Town 8 Aug 1780
from James Abeel, DQM Genl
seven waggons and 2 Continental horses
also one ditto? for the Conductor to ride
Hartman Leitheifor MM"

" sent onto Col Thompson on wagon and
four horses drove by Anthony Gould from
Cumberland County the team is very
indifferent and is prepped for 5 months by
Theolopolis Elmore Contractor of Cumberland
County"

"Aug 11 received from John Mitchell eng??
48 Publick horses and Jame Rensha?
1 hours FS for friend service home"

" Morris Town Aug 15 1780
Rec'd from James Abeel, DQM Genl one
wagon four collars four prs harness and strings
complete four pr braces four back and four
belly bands one tounge and two breast chains
two ??? four blind bridles one for rope leading
lines one tarr one tar pot one wagon cover one
doubletree one stretcher one back chain one
wagons bolt four Crippers four rope battens
for the use of Genl Glover and brigade
By order Coll Thompson WM Genl
Erzekiel Thomas "

"Rec'd Morris Town 12 Aug 1780
from James Abeel, DQM Genl
one team complete which promise to
deliver to Col James Thompson WMGenl
at Head Quarters Now!
One ammunitions waggon with horses
and stretcher
four horse branded GA 2 greys 2 whites
four collars four pair of ?? hung?
four G Hamstrings
four pair braces two breast chains
four back four belly belts two cowles
two cruciformm four blind bridles four
rope halters one tar pot one basket
one dock chain
one padlock and one leading lines
P Elisha Jolly"

"Rec'd Morris Town 12 Aug 1780
from James Abeel, DQM Genl two horses
in place of two that was lost on the road
fourteen wagons fifty six collars fifty six
prs harness and strings compte fifty six
prs braces fifty six back bands fifty six
belly bands twenty eight breast chains
fourteen tongue chains fifty eight blind
bindles twenty eight bindles fourteen
for leading lines fourteen wagon covers
fourteen wago bolts fourteen tarr pots
twenty eight couppers fourteen doubletree
fourteen stretchers fourteen block chains
one wooden saw and two axes for the use
of Genl Poors brigade by order of Col Thompson
WMGenl also 2 copper kettles David Page
NB two horses and two bridles were lost this
morning and two others were furnished by
James Abeel QMG"

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 14 1780
from James Abeel, DQM one wagon
harness complete by order of James
Thompson WMGenl for the use of Genl,
Poors brigade Now!
One wagon with doubletree bolt stretcher
tongue lock chains
four collars
four prs harness hung
four prs braces
four breast chains
four back four belly bands
two doubles four blind Bridles
John Dole
X his mark"

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 16 1780
from James Abeel, DQM
one wagon four back four belly braces
four collars one tongue one breast chain
four pr braces two doubles
one doubletree four blind bridles
one sack chain one pair rope leaders
one wagon bolt one wagon cover
two couplers four rope halters
for the use of GenL Leonards brigade
by order of James Thompson WMGenl
Benj Pike"

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 14 1780
from James Abeel, DQM one wagon
four collars four prs harness hung compl
four prs braces four back and four belly
One tongue and two breast chains
two couplers four blind bridles one
pr rope leading lines oneTarr pot
one wagon cover one doubletree
one stretcher one back chain one
wagon bolt two couplers four rope halters
for the use of Genl Poors brigade by order
of Col Thompson WMG
Peter Wells"

• NEXT 16 ENTRIES: (note the CONTENT and brief description...most of the body was not transcribed)

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 16 1780
from James Abeel, DQM
CONTENT is Eight wagons and stuff
for the use of GenL Leonards brigade
by order of James Thompson WMGenl
William Davis"

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 16 1780
from James Abeel, DQM
CONTENT is two horse and related tack
for the use of the Hospital Dept per Order
John Scott A.C. of the Genl Hospitals
Hugh Turk"

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 18 1780
from James Abeel, DQM one public
horse branded USI posses of Richard
Clairborne DQM Genl ? J Durie" ??
(Not sure about name)

" Morris Town 19 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM one gray horse which i promise
to deliver Coll Thompson WMG at camp
signed duplicate Chris Barston? "

"Rec'd Morris Town Aug 20 1780
from James Abeel, DQM
drove by Jacob Birch Benj Price and Isaac Swallows
CONTENT is 12 horses 3 wagons and more
which i promise to deliver Coll Thompson WMGenl
Benj Price"

"Rec'd Morris Town 20 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM one gray horse which i promise
CONTENT 2 related Transaction for horse, et
to deliver to Col Thompson WMG at camp
William Coughlin"
Another attached Receipt signed by "Wm. Childs"

"Rec'd Morris Town 22 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is 40 horses, wagons and related tack.supplies
promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
John Barr? J Des?? " can't read it

"Rec'd Morris Town 22 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is 44 wagon horses, 15 wagons and related tack.supplies
promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
Jonas Pallanne? " hard to read name

"Rec'd Morris Town 22 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is 60 horses, 11 wagons and related tack.supplies
promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
Thomas Penn "

"Rec'd Morris Town 22 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is one open wagon and related tack.supplies
For the use of GenL Patterson's Brigade
per order Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
Abiel Atwood"
also signed Wm Campfield

"Morris Town 23 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is seven teams complete with 28 horses and 7 wagons
and related tack.supplies
promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
Henry Herder"

"Morris Town 23 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM one waggon in good order which I
promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
Jacob Berent " Name??

"Rec'd Morris Town 24 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is four wagon and related tack.supplies
which i promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
D Sizermann" ??

" Morris Town 24 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM
CONTENT is sixty horses and fifteen wagons and related tack.supplies
For the use of Artillery per order of Col Thompson WMGenl
Rich Smithers"

"Rec'd Morris Town 25 Aug 1780 Recd of James
Abeel DQM one horse colour brown
which i promise to deliver to Col Thompson WMGenl at camp
James Gove ?????"

SOLD

1263-1

CONTINUED:

Excellent info on G. Washington's Quartermaster Process can be studied in:


Supplying Washington's Army by Erma Risch
Center of Military History
United States Army
Washington DC 1981

From Rutger's Library Collection:

REVOLUTIONARY WAR MANUSCRIPT MATERIALS

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
Letter to Assistant Quartermaster General Charles Pettit. Morristown, N.J.,
October 31, 1778. Abeel was Deputy Quartermaster General of the Continental Army.

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
Military letters received, 1778-1780; draft of a letter to Nathanael Greene and leaf
from receipt book kept as Deputy Quartermaster General, 1780. Acquackanonk [Passaic],
Middlebrook [Bound Brook], Morristown, Springfield, etc., N.J., etc., 1778-1780.
11 items. Correspondents include James Caldwell, Nathanael Greene and Lord Stirling.

Abeel, James, 1733-1825.
Receipt book kept as Deputy Quartermaster. Morristown, N.J., December 10,
1779-January 30,1780 1 Vol. Photocopy.


MORE INFO and RESOURCES:

The following article is COPIED verbatim from www.worldhistory.biz and is an excellent
overview of the time period covered by the Receipt Book

In a hilly, wooded area of northern New Jersey, Morristown was a small settlement
containing iron and powder works strategically located about 25 miles from British
-occupied New York. It provided a secure defensive position from which General George
Washington could watch for signs of enemy troop movements. In fact, the Continental
army had wintered there once before, in early 1777, after the triumphs of the Battles
of Trenton and Princeton (December 26, 1776, and January 3, 1777). At that time,
privations were acute, and smallpox had ravaged the troops, but those ordeals paled
in comparison to the hardships of the second Morristown encampment.

The weather was the greatest adversary at Morristown. There had been at least three
storms in the last two weeks of November, and when Washington arrived on December 1,
it was amid snow and hail. The army filtered into camp throughout the month. The men
were to occupy the wooded area known as Jockey Hollow, about four miles from Morristown,
and immediately began to fell trees for building shelters. Approximately 1,200 log huts
eventually made up the encampment, and most of the soldiers were housed within a month.
But during the building process, sleet, freezing temperatures, and numerous blizzards
dumped more than six feet of snow on the area, burying men in their tents and erasing
all traces of the roads. Area waterways froze to such a depth that heavy carriages could
be driven across them. In early January, the quartermaster reported that half the men in
camp were naked and two-thirds starved. One soldier later noted a time when four days passed
without anything to eat. When the storms abated, many men either deserted or plundered
neighboring farms for provisions. Supplies were a persistent problem. Hoping to stop the
marauding bands and yet provide for the army’s needs, Washington divided New Jersey into
11 districts and assigned a quota of grain and cattle for each. Local magistrates
cooperated willingly with the apportionment of requisitions, and foodstuffs began arriving
at Morristown as the roads became passable. The bounty lasted for only a short time, however,
and by late February supplies were scarce once again. In addition, the depreciation of the
Continental currency made purchasing provisions increasingly difficult. Without adequate negotiable
funds, the army’s supplies were only a few days ahead of consumption, which kept the men in constant
need of food, clothes, medical supplies, and other necessities.

The bleak conditions lowered morale and caused behavior to deteriorate. Officers were
court-martialed for unbecoming conduct, trading with the enemy, and unapproved absences.
Enlisted men were guilty of neglecting their weapons, plundering, drinking, desertion, and
rowdy conduct. Mindful of the severe depredations the men faced, as well as the boredom,
Washington judiciously tempered the punishments for infractions of discipline and encouraged
recreational activities and declared holidays, including St. Patrick’s Day.

Washington and his officers, of course, fared somewhat better during their stay at
Morristown. Those encamped at Jockey Hollow had larger cabins than the enlisted men,
who slept 12 to a hut. Washington, believing he must maintain a style befitting the importance
of his office and that comfort was a prerogative of command, moved into the Ford mansion in
Morristown. The general and his staff occupied most of the house, leaving two rooms for
the widow Theodosia Ford and her four children. And the general had the pleasure of
Mrs. Washington’s company for the winter. Washington’s administrative labors were enormous,
and he handled much of the burden alone. He was overindulgent in granting furloughs to his
officers so that too few remained to assist him with the problems of supply, personnel,
intelligence, and enlistment. The limited military operations Washington undertook had
disastrous results. In January, he planned a raid on Staten Island, but the British learned
of it in time to prepare. Consequently, hundreds of ill-clad revolutionary soldiers suffered
frostbite from exposure, six were killed, 16 captured, and those returning had only a few prisoners
and some meager provisions to show for their effort. Even worse, the ill-fated mission and the
plundering done by some of the Continentals along the way sparked retaliatory raids by the British,
which inflamed tempers on both sides. Furthermore, Washington’s fear that continuing shortages in
food, clothing, and money might lead to mutiny were realized on May 25 with the rebellion of part
of the Connecticut line. Though the uprising was quickly subdued, Washington was still struggling
with these problems and the need for more men when British troop movements were detected in early
June. By the end of the month, with the supplies that had been accumulated removed to safety and a
small detachment left behind, the Continental army marched out of Morristown, ending a brutal
encampment that had seen the ranks depleted by 86 deaths and 1,066 desertions."

See also CONTINENTAL ARMY, MUTINIES Of.

Further reading: U. S. Department of the Interior, A History and Guide:
Morristown National Historical Park, New Jersey (Washington, D. C.: National
Park Service, 1983); Page Smith, A New Age Now Begins: A People’s History
of the American Revolution, vol. 2 (New York: McGraw Hill, 1989). —Rita M. Broyles"

END OF www.worldhistory.biz article; specific article found at:

https://www.worldhistory.biz/modern-history/81263-morristown-new-jersey-encampment-of-1779.html

OTHER INFO:

DQM James Abeel's General Job Description: During the American Revolution,
a Quartermaster Officers was responsible for procuring, or otherwise securing,
adequate food, light and heavy weapons, ammunition, uniforms, tents, firewood, tools
and utensils, and other necessary items for the army to support
all encampments, battles, trips, etc. This includes transportation specifics such as horses,
wagons, tack and other supporting equipment and materials. In addition, the quartermaster
officer is responsible for the logistics and movement of supplies from sources to the supply
depot or directly to the supported brigades or requestors regardless of location. A successful
quartermaster was as much magician as officer, and In many ways, had a direct impact on troop
morale because an army needs to be fed, clothed and appropriately armed at all times, whether or
not the funds were available, or enough lead time was given for procurement. Any deficiencies were
often blamed directly on the competency or efficiency of the quartermaster officer.





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